September 2009

WM Smith of the Houston Press named our “Humboldt” one of the alltime marijuana anthems.

http://blogs.houstonpress.com

Down to Seeds and Stems Again Blues: Eight Great Pot Songs
By William Michael Smith Sep. 21 2009

John Prine may have set the standard for pot songs in American music with his sardonic “Illegal Smile,” but that snowball picked up considerable speed as it rolled downhill. Here are eight more excellent odes to the sweetest leaf.

1. Cab Calloway, “Reefer Man”: Other than Louis Armstrong, perhaps no one in the glory days of Harlem jazz had a more musical sense of the possibilities of the sacred spliff. Calloway’s turns of phrase are a perfect example of pot-addled nonsense: “If he trades you dimes for nickels and calls watermelons pickles, then you know your talkin’ to that reefer man.”

2. Fraternity of Man, “Don’t Bogart Me”: Easy Rider was a watershed event in hippie culture. From the opening scene at LAX, when Peter Fonda extracts the smuggled cocaine from his chopper’s gas tank, to the acid trip in New Orleans to the hilarious scene in which Fonda and Dennis Hopper introduce novice hick lawyer Jack Nicholson to marijuana, the movie put drugs directly into the face of authority. Having their song included in the soundtrack would mark Fraternity of Man’s career high-water mark.

3. Neil Young, “Roll Another Number (For the Road)”: A stone classic stoner anthem from the only guy who could arm-wrestle David Crosby for the title of biggest stoner in Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Neil’s version is great, but to me Country Dick Montana and the Beat Farmers immortalized this mind-altered ditty on their 1989 live album Loud and Plowed.

4. Commander Cody & the Lost Planet Airmen, “Down to Seeds and Stems Again Blues”: It wasn’t long after Lonesome Onry and Mean arrived in Austin in the summer of 1973 that it seemed everyone in town could sing the words, “I saw your new man yesterday wearin’ my brand new shoes/ And I’m down to seeds and stems again too.”

Of course, this was about the time our soon to have his teat in the ringer Lt. Governor Ben Barnes made the banner of the headline of American-Statesman with his pronouncement that “Austin is the marijuana capitol of the world.” Where the fuck did he think it was, College Station?

5. New Riders of the Purple Sage, “Panama Red” and “Lonesome L.A. Cowboy”: The New Riders hit it big with these two decidedly different efforts. Peter Rowan’s “Cowboy” seemed like a script for Gram Parsons’ life when LOM first heard it. And “Panama Red” was such a fun, gentle, screw-you ode to the budding pot culture. Dig that tie-dyed backdrop!6. Brewer & Shipley, “One Toke Over the Line”: A huge hit as FM “underground” radio was taking off and the Sixties were exploding into protest and violence, “Toke” brought serious heat down on these guys. But perhaps funnier (or scarier?) than Spiro Agnew’s castigation and inclusion on Richard Nixon’s infamous “enemies list,” the tune was covered by cheesemeister Lawrence Welk and his Champagne Music Makers. Go figure.

7. I See Hawks In L.A., “Humboldt”: The Hawks come in a direct line from the Byrds, Burritos, New Riders et.al. and these Los Angeles roots favorites have always traveled their musical trail surrounded by the odor of the burning bush, and they nail the whole Northern Californian pot grower vibe with “Humboldt.” Best pot dealer line ever? “I’d be glad to plant corn in the ground but corn don’t go for three thousand a pound.” And, yes, that’s Paul Marshall, formerly of Strawberry Alarm Clock (“Incense & Peppermints”), on bass.

WM Smith of the Houston Press named our “Humboldt” one of the alltime marijuana anthems.

http://blogs.houstonpress.com

Down to Seeds and Stems Again Blues: Eight Great Pot Songs
By William Michael Smith Sep. 21 2009

John Prine may have set the standard for pot songs in American music with his sardonic “Illegal Smile,” but that snowball picked up considerable speed as it rolled downhill. Here are eight more excellent odes to the sweetest leaf.

1. Cab Calloway, “Reefer Man”: Other than Louis Armstrong, perhaps no one in the glory days of Harlem jazz had a more musical sense of the possibilities of the sacred spliff. Calloway’s turns of phrase are a perfect example of pot-addled nonsense: “If he trades you dimes for nickels and calls watermelons pickles, then you know your talkin’ to that reefer man.”

2. Fraternity of Man, “Don’t Bogart Me”: Easy Rider was a watershed event in hippie culture. From the opening scene at LAX, when Peter Fonda extracts the smuggled cocaine from his chopper’s gas tank, to the acid trip in New Orleans to the hilarious scene in which Fonda and Dennis Hopper introduce novice hick lawyer Jack Nicholson to marijuana, the movie put drugs directly into the face of authority. Having their song included in the soundtrack would mark Fraternity of Man’s career high-water mark.
3. Neil Young, “Roll Another Number (For the Road)”: A stone classic stoner anthem from the only guy who could arm-wrestle David Crosby for the title of biggest stoner in Crosby, Stills, Nash and Young. Neil’s version is great, but to me Country Dick Montana and the Beat Farmers immortalized this mind-altered ditty on their 1989 live album Loud and Plowed.

4. Commander Cody & the Lost Planet Airmen, “Down to Seeds and Stems Again Blues”: It wasn’t long after Lonesome Onry and Mean arrived in Austin in the summer of 1973 that it seemed everyone in town could sing the words, “I saw your new man yesterday wearin’ my brand new shoes/ And I’m down to seeds and stems again too.”
Of course, this was about the time our soon to have his teat in the ringer Lt. Governor Ben Barnes made the banner of the headline of American-Statesman with his pronouncement that “Austin is the marijuana capitol of the world.” Where the fuck did he think it was, College Station?

5. New Riders of the Purple Sage, “Panama Red” and “Lonesome L.A. Cowboy”: The New Riders hit it big with these two decidedly different efforts. Peter Rowan’s “Cowboy” seemed like a script for Gram Parsons’ life when LOM first heard it. And “Panama Red” was such a fun, gentle, screw-you ode to the budding pot culture. Dig that tie-dyed backdrop!

6. Brewer & Shipley, “One Toke Over the Line”: A huge hit as FM “underground” radio was taking off and the Sixties were exploding into protest and violence, “Toke” brought serious heat down on these guys. But perhaps funnier (or scarier?) than Spiro Agnew’s castigation and inclusion on Richard Nixon’s infamous “enemies list,” the tune was covered by cheesemeister Lawrence Welk and his Champagne Music Makers. Go figure.

7. I See Hawks In L.A., “Humboldt”: The Hawks come in a direct line from the Byrds, Burritos, New Riders et.al. and these Los Angeles roots favorites have always traveled their musical trail surrounded by the odor of the burning bush, and they nail the whole Northern Californian pot grower vibe with “Humboldt.” Best pot dealer line ever? “I’d be glad to plant corn in the ground but corn don’t go for three thousand a pound.” And, yes, that’s Paul Marshall, formerly of Strawberry Alarm Clock (“Incense & Peppermints”), on bass.

Pacifica News Service

LOS ANGELES – 9/11 conspiracy theorists are calling it a real stunner: a key breakthrough in solving the crime of the new century has come from, of all places, a country rock band based out of Southern California.

In an exclusive interview taped in January, Sally Goodman (Amy Goodman’s younger sister) of radio station KPFK talks with Paul Lacques and Rob Waller, guitarist and lead singer respectively, of veteran “alt country” band I See Hawks In L.A.

Sally Goodman: Gentlemen, it’s a pleasure to be with you today.

Rob Waller: Likewise, Amy, er, Sally. Is it too late for me to use a pseudonym? I guess so.

Paul Lacques: Sally, you’re a dead ringer for your sister.

SG: I get that a lot. This is an interesting café, is this new?
PL: It’s pretty new. Intelligentsia, in the heart of Silverlake, Really good coffee.
RW: Precious coffee, you might say.
SG: Explain.
PL: Oh, you know . . . it’s . . . special.
RW: Thinks it’s special. They brew their coffee a cup at a time.
SG: Seriously?
RW: And call me paranoid, but if you aren’t right for the vibe here, they’ll screw up the heart pattern on your latte. They’re particular about who’s festooning their outdoor tables.
PL: Dude, you’re paranoid. Check out this swan in my soy cappuccino.
RW: Was the barista friendly?
PL: No.
RW Case closed.
PL: Not for me. My inquiry will continue.
SG Speaking of cases, let’s get to the heart of your 9/11 discovery.
PL: Well first off, this is all conceptual stuff, armchair theorizing, so let’s not make a bigger deal of this than it is. It’s just connecting the dots. The ground work has been done by thousands of researchers, mostly bloggers.
RW: None of whom get a pay check from a major newspaper or TV.
PL: Real journalism is being done for free by guys with greasy hair sitting at cafes with their laptops.
RW: Like that guy at the counter.
PL: Intelligensia must love it when he parks himself. Serious vibe killer.
RW: My point exactly.
SG: Anyway—
RW: I mean, when’s the last time the New York Times or CBS broke a big story?
They missed the Kennedy assassination plot, they hand walked us straight into
Vietnam, gave Bush a free ride on Iraq.
PL: Until 2004. Then they found their missing testicles. They’ll never get it right.
It’s not their purpose.
RW: And now they love Obama. As long as he channels the money into Wall Street.
Remember Muhammad Ali’s Rope A Dope? Well this is Hope A Dope.
PL: Nice!
SG: To get back to 9/11 . . .
RW: Right. Okay—well, first, a little background. I mean, there are just too many
strange little events, coincidences, improbabilities, impossibilities in the official
9/11 story. It’s your first clue that something’s very wrong.
PL: Just like the Kennedy assassination. And with a cherry picked panel to investigate,
and a big thick book that ignores inconvenient facts.
RW: Yeah, the personnel on the 9/11 official investigation team is a whole story
unto itself. Talk about foxes investigating the tragedy in the chicken coop.
That’s a four hour conversation just to look under that rock.
PL: That’s the thing. This is so huge. So many elements. So many bewildering
elements.
SG: Well—give us a few. The ones that relate to your theory.
RW: Yeah, the theory. It needs setting up. The theory’s
really simple.
SG: Well . . . (inaudible)
PL: Okay, okay, let’s just list some things here, maybe a bit randomly, just to paint the
picture, the background field. For example: Osama Bin Laden was named instigator
of 9/11 on the same day as the attacks.
RW: Just like Oswald was named the assassin within an hour of Kennedy’s shooting.
PL: And Osama Bin Laden was a CIA asset.
RW: As was Lee Harvey Oswald, as was George Bush, senior, who says he can’t remember where he was the day Kennedy was assassinated. Think about it. A few years later, Bush is Director of the CIA. But denies ever having been an operative.
SG: I’ve heard this before, can we stick to 9/11?
PL: Yes. More strange 9/11 stuff: Mohammad Atta’s passport was found after the
9/11 attack in rubble a few blocks from the World Trade Center. Impossible.
RW: A middle east diplomat says he was ordered to give U.S. visas to many of the hijackers, years before 9/11. They had no official business to conduct in the U.S., but were given special status, with no explanation. Five of the 9/11 hijackers listed a military base as their place of residence on their driver’s licenses.
PL: And there’s lots of anecdotal evidence of the FBI and CIA ignoring private citizens’
suspicions of the hijackers’ behavior while they were in the U.S. For years.
RW: The FBI doesn’t list the 9/11 attacks as one of Bin Laden’s crimes, because they say there’s no hard evidence linking him to 9/11. Bin Laden didn’t claim responsibility for 9/11 for quite some time, at which point an imposter Bin Laden may have been put into place.
PL: Yeah, and then no more Bin Laden video messages, just audio. And we failed to catch Osama–the most powerful military on earth, with drone planes and thousands of Navy Seal and Special Ops guys who can survive on lizards and pond scum, and the dictator of Pakistan in our back pocket. And we couldn’t catch Bin Laden.
RW: The buildings. That’s an encyclopedia’s worth of discussion.
SG: Can you summarize?
RW: Building Seven is the crux of 9/11 conspiracy, the biggest piece of unexplainable evidence. It wasn’t hit by an airplane, it had one or two small fires burning in it.
PL: And it collapses! Just like the Twin towers, except there was no reason for it to collapse.
RW: You can see it on YouTube, millions saw it live, you’ve got the police on the ground waving the crowd back, saying they’re going to blow the building.
PL: And then Building 7 blows up, collapses, an orderly pancaking just like the Twin towers! And in 2002 you’ve got Larry Silverstein, the owner of the World Trade Center, this was on PBS, it’s on YouTube too, telling an interviewer that he was told by NYFD that they’d have to pull the building.
RW: Not knowing that it takes days or weeks for a demolition crew to wire a building to explode.
PL: Same with the Twin Towers. They’ve been hit, they’re burning, but these are holes in just a few stories of giant buildings. And then suddenly they both collapse, within an hour of each other, in identical style, straight down, top to bottom.
RW: No tilting, no partial collapse. Total annihilation, and totally orderly.
PL: Like only a controlled demolition can do. There are building engineers who have pointed this out, but try getting them on The View. There are investigators who found traces of thermite used exclusively for controlled building demolition in the 9/11 wreckage. But you won’t ever hear this in mainstream media. Not yet.
RW: Because it’s unthinkable. To think that your own government, or officials high up in the government, would kill your own president, or 3,000 innocents.
PL: Unthinkable, unless you travel to other countries. Iraq and Vietnam know very well what we’re capable of. Cambodia. Panama.
RW: Oh, we’ll do it here. We met someone whose cousin ran errands at a big architecture firm that we can’t name. They designed embassy buildings and had a full time CIA officer with his own office in their headquarters. Why? Because it’s standard practice to wire our embassy buildings in other countries to blow up–but now it’s happening here. Building 7’s tenants were the IRS, CIA, Secret Service, FBI, DOD, the SEC. And who was on the board of Securacom http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Securacom — the company that ran security for the World Trade Center? George Bush’s brother Marvin. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marvin_P._Bush
These buildings were doomed!
SG: Okay, but I’d like to get to the heart of your theory. I’ve got a plane to catch at 4 p.m.
PL: Where are you headed?
SG: To Obama’s inauguration.
RW: Cool. Say hi to Zbigniew Brzezinski for us.
SG: Jimmy Carter’s security advisor?
PL: And mentor to Barack Obama. Maybe Z will show you the photo of him with
his pal Osama bin Laden.
http://www.google.com/images?hl=en&source=imghp&biw=1246&bih=956&q=zbigniew+brzezinski+bin+laden&gbv=2&aq=1&aqi=g2&aql=&oq=Zbigniew+Brzezinski&gs_rfai=
RW: That could be the title of his autobiography: Ziggy B: from Osama to Obama.
PL: This shit is deep. Many layers over many decades. The CIA worked with Bin Laden for years, because he was fighting the Soviet Union in Afghanistan. And there’s so much other 9/11 bafflement—no fighter jets intercept the hijacked planes, 3 perfect hits by people who’d never flown any kind of jet, flight 93’s strange crash pattern. There’s no clear surveillance camera footage of the Pentagon crash, in the most heavily watched piece of real estate on earth? The huge short selling of American Airlines stock just before the attack. The Bin Ladens flown out of the country on a special plane on 9/12, while the whole U.S. air space is grounded. The long friendship between the Bush and Bin Laden families. On and on. It’s so blatant.
RW: Secrets in plain sight.
SG: So what you’re saying—
RW: Okay, here it is: Elements of the U.S. government, quite possibly either rogue or mainstream elements of the CIA and DOD, conspired with the 19 hijackers and other long time CIA assets or operatives to attack the World Trade Center and the Pentagon. To create the new Pearl Harbor that neocons had been citing for years as necessary to justify a ramped up presence in the Middle East.
PL: Nothing new there. But here’s a big problem for conspiracy nuts like ourselves: how do U.S. officials interact with suicide bombers? There’s a cultural disconnect. Anyone willing to die in a fiery crash into the Pentagon is a religious fanatic beyond our comprehension. They’re not going to take meetings with the CIA or Defense Department.
RW: So here’s our little contribution to 9/11 conspiracy theory: the 19 hijackers weren’t suicide bombers. They were long time CIA operatives, and they thought they were on a completely different mission.
SG: Which was?
RW: Who knows? Their field officer tells them they’re going to hijack the planes and force the pilot to land in Yemen.
PL: Or Caracas. Was Chavez in power in 2001?
SG: So—
PL: So the hijackers do their job, they storm the cockpit, order the pilot to fly to wherever—
RW: Because the hijackers aren’t going to fly the planes themselves—
PL: No way. They can’t. They’ve never flown a passenger jet. It’s impossible. So they
order the pilots to fly to wherever, but the pilots can’t. The passenger jets have been taken over by CIA or DOD installed JPALS guidance systems. At the same moment that the transponders shut off.
RW: Do a Google search for Raytheon company and JPALS. It’s a guidance system for missiles and
aircraft. It’s been around for years. It says right on the Raytheon website that the system is designed to take over the flight of an airplane.

http://www.dcmilitary.com/stories/103008/tester_28188.shtmlhttp://www.systron.com/pro_QRS11.asp
PL: So as the hijackers and passengers and pilots all watched helplessly, their planes turned around on their own and headed for New York and Washington.
RW: Probably guided by some tweaked out 30 year old guy in a bunker
near Langley, or Palmdale. Same guy who guided the smart bombs into Baghdad two years later.

PL: And is now firing Predator drone missiles at Afghan houses.

RW: He’s probably playing Donkey Kong as we speak.
PL: Or they knocked him off. Like Oswald.
SG: What about the boxcutters, the murder of passengers, the murder of the pilots, the cell phone recordings?
RW: Anything could have happened. Maybe Todd Beamer did say “let’s roll.” I’ll bet all kinds of people up there acted heroically. But they didn’t have a chance. JPALS was guiding them to doom.
SG: Why couldn’t these hijackers have been real suicide bombers who got lucky?
RW: These guys weren’t poor kids from the heart of a war zone whose brothers had been killed by U.S. weaponry. These are older men, middle class, with educations. They have wild parties, get thrown out of bars. They shatter the psychological model of a suicide bomber. You should read some of the articles explaining this anomaly. Hilarious. Like that old movie.
PL: The Manchurian Candidate. Really cornball.
RW: So our scenario ends with three remote guided passenger planes hitting their targets with absolute precision. And a fourth disappearing under mysterious circumstances.
PL: It must have been so eerie on board. Passengers, pilots, crew, hijackers, and no one knows what’s going on. And they approach Manhattan. Someone should write a play.
RW: Dude, I think you’re reckless enough to pull it off.
PL: Thanks.
RW: And then the script continues. Within hours we know who did it, why, who masterminded it. Awfully efficient for a government that let this all happen.
PL: And the Bush administration plays the grief and hysteria like Yo Yo Ma. Bush and friends are brilliant. This guy is no buffoon, much as Buzzflash and Huffington Post and all the other lame-o’s enjoy that stereotype. And they didn’t necessarily have anything to do with the 9/11 plot. But they knew how to react. It’s a radical consensus with the reins of power.
RW: And 28 days after 9/11 we’re bombing the Taliban in Afghanistan. Huh? And there are so few protests to this infantile destruction. To this day. Obama got elected promising to ramp up the war in Afghanistan. It’s our holy war.
PL: Hope A Dope.
RW: I claim authorship on that, you’re a witness, Sally.
SG: Do you also claim authorship for your interesting theory?
RW & PL: Naahhh . . . (laugh)
RW: Search the web. I’ll bet lots of people have proposed this exact theory. We’ve plagiarized someone. That’s the glory and the sloppiness of the internet. But we’re in a country rock band. It’s a nice angle for your story.
PL: Should we mention our upcoming shows?
RW: Let’s pretend we have some class.
SG: Gentlemen, it’s been fascinating. I’ve got a plane to catch.
PL: Ooh, nice final sentence!
RW: Till you added on.
PL: Good point.

I SEE HAWKS ON TWITTER

September 10, 2009

HAWKS HONOR VIN SCULLY

September 6, 2009

The time has come for a rare granting of the I See Hawks in L.A. Lifetime Achievement Award. This award is given, well, not necessarily every year but only when the honoree has given so much to the cultural life of the city of Los Angeles that the award is merited. We have chosen this […]

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